Posts

WHY YOU SHOULD LIVE IN BUENOS AIRES

European atmosphere, great nightlife

After the 2001 economic collapse, Argentina went from being one of South America’s most expensive cities to the cheapest almost overnight. Nearly 10 years later, the dollar is still strong against the Argentine peso, making vibrant Buenos Aires (known as the “Paris of South America”) a cosmopolitan city that is just as affordable as it is beautiful. Unlike most Latin American cities, it has a distinctly European flair — not only because of the French-style architecture seen throughout, but in the beauty of its people who, only a few generations ago, were immigrants of mostly Italian and Spanish origins.
It’s a mystery how Argentines maintain their fit physiques considering the gastronomic specialties of the region are beef and wine. There are tons of restaurants to choose from, and a typical steak dinner for two including wine, appetizer, main dish, dessert, and coffee can run for as little as $50, however, the cuts and quality of meat are far likely to exceed that of a New York steakhouse. Most restaurants offer local wines at a fraction of the cost of what they’re sold for outside the country. Dinnertime starts around 10 p.m., but the real nightlife begins after midnight and lasts well into the early hours of the morning. Although people are very fashionable, dress is informal, so you can trade in your suit and tie for a more business-casual wardrobe.

WHY YOU SHOULD LIVE IN BUENOS AIRES IN 2009

Rising reputation for expat living, affordability
In 2008, Travel and Leisure rated Buenos Aires No. 2 on their list of World’s Best Cities. Although the city is a great place to visit, in 2009 it’s an even better place to live. It is home to a vibrant expat community and it’s an excellent place to lay low during the dramatic financial crisis without sacrificing your lifestyle.
Speaking Spanish is not a prerequisite for living in Buenos Aires as many Argentines are fluent in English and are willing to practice their language skills with foreigners. Whether you’re looking to get back up on your feet and reinvent yourself —  learn a new language, cultivate some new interests — or simply ride out the financial storm in an environment where the dollar is strong and life is easy, Buenos Aires is the city for you.

Source:Askmen.com

How do Argentineans eat?

Typical breakfast with cafe au lait, toast, butter and dulce de leche

Typical breakfast with cafe au lait, toast, butter and dulce de leche

Discover how Argentineans eat on this delicious article about Argentinean food customs.

Argentinian breakfast is somewhat light compared to what travellers from English-speaking countries are accustomed to. Hotels typically provide a free buffet consisting of coffee, tea, drinkable yogurt, assorted pastries and toast, fruit, and perhaps cereal. These kinds of breakfasts are also readily available in the many cafes.

How Do Argentineans Eat At Lunchtime?

Lunch is a big meal in Argentina, typically taken in the early afternoon. Lunch is so big because dinner is not until late: 8.30PM to 9.00PM at the earliest, more commonly at 9PM or even later. Most restaurants do not serve food until then except for pastries or small ham-and-cheese toasted sandwiches (tostados), for afternoon tea between 6 and 8 PM. Tea is the one meal that is rarely skipped. A few cafes do offer heartier fare all day long, but don’t expect anything more substantial than pizza or a milanesa (breaded meat fillets) or a lomito (steak sandwiches) outside of normal Argentine mealtimes.

Argentina Style Dinner: Typical Meals

Dinner is usually eaten at 10:00 P.M. and typically consists of appetizers, entrees, and desserts. Be aware that, similarly to the European “entree”, (entrada) refers to the appetizers. The north american “entree” is refered to as “main dish” or “plato principal”. For appetizers, there are empanadas (meat turnovers or dumplings), chorizo or morcilla (pork or blood sausage), and assortments of achuras (entrails). For an entree there is usually bife de chorizo (T-bone steak) and various types of salads. Then for dessert, there is flan (custard) topped with dulce de leche and whipped cream.

Argentina: Parrillada or barbeque on a grill or parrilla

Argentina: Parrillada or barbeque on a grill or parrilla

Beef is the central component of the Argentine diet, and Argentine beef is world-famous for good reason. Definitely check out Argentine barbecue: asado, sometimes also called parrillada, because it is made on a parrilla, or grill. There is no way around it – foodwise Argentina is virtually synonymous with beef. The beef is some of the best in the world, and there are many different cuts of meat. Lomo (tenderloin) and bife de chorizo are excellent. Having a parrillada dinner is one of the best ways to experience it, preferably with a bottle of wine from Mendoza. In some popular areas, parrilladas are available from small buffets, or sidewalk carts and barbecue trailers. Skewers and steak sandwiches can then be purchased to go.

Fugazzeta a classic in Buenos Aires pizza

Fugazzeta a classic in Buenos Aires pizza

Don’t Forget The Pizza & Pasta

Given that a large portion of Argentines are of Italian, Spanish and French descent, such fare is very widespread and of high quality; pizzerias and specialized restaurants are very common. Take note that a convention observed in Argentina is to treat the pasta and sauce as separate items; some travellers have found out what they thought was cheap pasta only to find that they were not getting any sauce (just pasta with drizzled olive oil). You will see the pastas for one price and then the sauces for an additional charge. This happens more often with side dishes. It is not customary for Argentineans to have the whole dish pre-selected for them. In Argentina, you get to pick exactly what you want your dishes to be served with!

Buenos Aires Pizza

Buenos Aires Pizza

How Do Argentineans Eat: Amazing Desserts

Buenos Aires Bakeries - Desserts

Buenos Aires Bakeries – Desserts

Cafes, bakeries, and ice-cream shops (heladerías) are very popular. Inexpensive and high-quality snacks can be found in most commercial areas, and many have outdoor seating areas. Empanadas (turnovers) containing meats, cheeses, or many other fillings can be bought cheaply from restaurants or lunch counters. The Alfajor is a must try snack of a two cookies with a dulce de leche filling and can be purchased at virtually any local kiosco.

Smoking is now prohibited in most restaurants of Capital Federal and all of Mendoza’s restaurants.

 

Buenos Aires, Panama City and Santiago among men’s favored cities

Buenos Aires - disco and its people

Buenos Aires – disco and its people

The Latin American cities of Buenos Aires (#13), Panama City and Santiago have been included in a global list of 29 cities where men would most like to live, reports Reuters.
The list, assembled by  AskMen.com, put Chicago at the top, helped perhaps by President Obama’s association with that city.
AskMen.com used eight rating categories — livability, sports and entertainment, culture, fashion, sex and dating, health, power and money and the good life — when judging the winners.

Ratings took into account a list of factors including the rate of unemployment, income growth, ratios of single women to men, the cost of a pint of beer and the rate of male heart disease. An initial list of 60 was cut to 29.
AskMen.com’s editor-in-chief James Bassil said the unexpected appearance of cities such as Panama City and Santiago reflected that “the cost of living is low and there is cool development and suddenly they are appropriate places to live in 2009.”

Source: L.A. Times
,

A single Jewish tomb

A single Jewish tomb reminds visitors of the multi-denominational character of Buenos Aires. Although it sits unoccupied today, this is the only tomb in Recoleta Cemetery decorated with a Star of David:

Benjamin Breitman - Recoleta Cemetery - Buenos Aires - Argentina

Benjamin Breitman – Recoleta Cemetery – Buenos Aires – Argentina

When the cemetery was founded in 1822, the majority of the city’s population was Catholic so it was blessed accordingly. During the presidency of Bartolomé Mitre the blessing was officially removed when he insisted that a prominent member of the Masonic Order be buried there. Or so the story goes. These days, all public cemeteries in Buenos Aires are non-denominational. However given the conservative class of the families present, Recoleta Cemetery remains 99% Catholic.
Not much is known about Benjamín Breitman or how he came to purchase a plot, but the history of Jewish burials in Argentina began with the establishment of the community in Argentina. Currently, the tomb is empty because Breitman’s family has moved all caskets to another cemetery.
Founded in the 1860s the Templo Libertad on Plaza Lavalle may not be the oldest synagogue in Buenos Aires, but it was the most important for early Jewish immigrants.
Jewish tradition foregoes ostentatious burials, given that all are equal after death. The largest non-Catholic cemetery during the early years of the Jewish community in Buenos Aires was the Cementerio de Victoria (now Plaza 1º de Mayo). Sponsored mainly by the Protestant community & 50% funded by the UK, Jews & Protestants were buried together at the same location. Popularly referred to as the Cementerio de los Disidentes (Dissident’s Cemetery), it filled to capacity during the 1871 yellow fever epidemic. Back then if you weren’t Catholic, then you must be a dissident.
The Jewish community had an opportunity to claim part of Chacarita Cemetery when it opened but opted to wait for their own burial ground. In 1912 the Cementerio de Liniers opened (actually just outside the city limits of Buenos Aires) exclusively for Jews & was mainly for those of Ashkenazi descent. Being buried there still remains a sign of high status within the community.
Jews of Moroccan descent—many referred to as “impure” based on their connections with the mafia—opened a cemetery south of Buenos Aires in Avellaneda. It is currently closed.
In 1936, another cemetery was opened for poorer Jews in Tablada & the newest cemetery in Ciudadela is typically for those of Sephardic descent. All these cemeteries are closed to visitors. La Tablada Cemetery: Avenida Crovara 2824, 1766 La Tablada; Provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina. Largest Jewish cemetery in South America. A memorial monument for the 86 killed and 300 wounded in the bombing on July 18, 1994 was unveiled on July 16, 1995. La Tablada, which covers 138 acres and has 70,000 graves, is the largest Jewish cemetery in the country. With Latin America’s largest Jewish population, Argentina has 230,000 people who identify themselves as Jews. Tablada has computerized records.
45 known Jewish cemeteries exist in Argentina. JGS of Argentina has burial records for eighteen of those cemeteries, a total of 157,850 names current through 1997. The records cover about 100 years. Of these eighteen cemeteries, nine (of a total 11) are in the Buenos Aires area and nine (from 34 active ones) are in the country.

Source: After Life & JGS